Why Robinson Cano going to Seattle is no big deal for a Yankee fan

Robinson Cano holds a bat prior to a game betw...

Robinson Cano holds a bat prior to a game between the New York Yankees and Baltimore Orioles on August 28, 2011 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Does Robinson Cano need the money? I know it’s been a very long time since I posted here on The Outfield. Since Winter Storm Hercules has kept me home today, I thought I would share some thoughts.

The obvious answer to my question is no, Cano doesn’t need the money. But does anyone?

Before you say I’m just a bitter Yankee fan ranting about the loss of Cano, I have news for you, I wish him the best in Seattle.

I can’t argue with Cano’s production and what he’s done for the Yankees. On the field, yes, it is a loss, but over the long-term, this is a good move for New York. Time has certainly come for the organization to stop with long-term contracts that handicap the team later on.

I can cite numerous examples of long-term contracts in baseball that will hamper teams’ ability to sign younger, more productive talent. Players have come a long way in compensation, and in many situations to the detriment of a club’s ability to win long-term.

Cano, while a big talent and a household name, didn’t fill the seats. I watched numerous games from the comfort of my couch this past season. Without A-Rod or Jeter, there were many empty seats. If Cano couldn’t fill seats, is his on-field performance truly an asset?

If additions like McCann, Beltran and Ellsbury will attract fans to the Stadium, time will tell. I think they will. The off-season additions will fit with manager Joe Girardi’s desired style of baseball. The Yankees gave out some large contracts to these players, but the value is worth more than a single player.

The business of baseball never ends. Teams want to win championships, but owners want to fill seats. A player’s worth is more than just performance. It is the name on the jersey, the brand that player has become. Cano wasn’t that brand for the Yankees.

As the snow falls, I look forward to the new baseball season. Go Yankees.

Thanks for reading! All comments and feedback are always welcome!

 

Baseball All-Stars, Jim Thome, and Robinson Cano’s June: Some Thoughts on the Week In Baseball

English: Jim Thome

English: Jim Thome (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The All-Star selections are nearly complete. There is no surprise the Rangers and Yankees dominated the American League roster. Every season we seem to have issue with some selections. The most conspicuous snub is Matt Wieters. Wieters should be starting behind the plate. Wieters can thank the Rangers growing fan base for the snub. Fans, please select players for their performance, not the team jersey they wear.

The most impressive, Mike Trout of the Angels. The rookie sensation is simply phenomenal. The 20-year-old is batting a cool .339 with 9 homers and 33 RBI. What impresses the most, is his mastery of the lost art of the stolen base. Trout currently leads the American League with 22. Needless to say this rookie earned a well-deserved selection.

Centerfield for the American League is perplexing. Why is Granderson starting? Baltimore’s Adam Jones, and the aforementioned Mike Trout are more deserving of the starting job for the AL.

The question remains, will that other rookie phenom, Bryce Harper join the Mid-Summer Classic? When left to the fans who knows. My pick for the National League vote-in all-star is Chipper Jones. Call me sentimental, but his numbers .292/6/29, warrant the selection in my eyes. Consider this, 2012 is his last go-around. Let’s not discount anything Harper brings to the table, however he has his whole career ahead of him.

As Texas and New York dominated the American League selections; Giants fans exercised their voting power for the National League. That said, the Mets David Wright belongs starting at third base.

One last note about the selections and this goes out to Melky Cabrera. As a Yankee fan this is slightly frustrating. Melky put together an awesome first half. Where was this Melky when you were in Pinstripes? 2006 was the closest you came hitting .280. I digress. Congrats Cabrera.

Jim Thome Moving Down I-95

The Baltimore Orioles acquired power hitter Jim Thome from the Phillies. Thome will provide veteran leadership in the Oriole clubhouse. I’m interested to see what Showalter will do with Thome long-term. As with all players, Thome is not the significant threat he once was. Yet, I get the sense his .227 average is misleading. Batting in the middle of the order may just get the hitting juices going. But, time will tell.

Robinson Cano’s June

As Thome is in the twilight of his career, Robinson Cano is in the prime of his. 11 home runs in the month of June is rather impressive. Did I mention his 34 hits as well? Check out this from ESPN to see who Cano joins in the universe of Yankee history.

Cano will join Derek Jeter and Curtis Granderson when the American League takes the field on July 10th. Jeter’s selection is truly deserving. All three will look to lead the Yanks into the post season with another division title.

The week that was in baseball was entertaining to say the least.

Agree? Disagree? Let me know what you think!

All data from espn.com

Be careful Cano!

I do not consider myself to be a superstitious person. However, as a Yankee fan, I am concerned over Robinson Cano’s participation in the Home Run Derby. Over the past few years, players who participated in the Derby, stated it affected their hitting in the second half. My concern for Cano, is the jeopardy he is putting his MVP season in. Continue reading